top of page

fueraabbott Group

Public·8 members
Sevastyan Simonov
Sevastyan Simonov

PORTABLE Best Books For Unix Beginners. Human Goods Persona Micro Grado Favorite Royal [BETTER]


??PORTABLE?? Best Books For Unix Beginners




Introduction




Unix is one of the oldest and most influential operating systems in the history of computing. It was developed in the 1970s at Bell Labs by a group of legendary programmers, including Ken Thompson, Dennis Ritchie, Brian Kernighan and Rob Pike. Unix is known for its simplicity, elegance, portability and power.




PORTABLE Best Books For Unix Beginners. Human goods persona micro grado favorite Royal


Download: https://www.google.com/url?q=https%3A%2F%2Fgohhs.com%2F2udbWg&sa=D&sntz=1&usg=AOvVaw14wVUMilWp37YLZ4TxYc3b



Learning Unix is essential for anyone who wants to master the fundamentals of operating systems, networking, programming and system administration. Unix provides a rich set of tools and utilities that can help you perform various tasks efficiently and creatively. Unix also forms the basis of many modern operating systems, such as Linux, MacOS and BSD.


One of the best ways to learn Unix is by reading books written by experts and practitioners who have deep knowledge and experience with this operating system. Books can offer you comprehensive and detailed explanations, examples, exercises and tips that can help you understand and apply Unix concepts and skills.


However, not all books are created equal. Some books may be too advanced or too outdated for beginners, while others may be too superficial or too boring for readers. How can you choose the best books for Unix beginners?


In this article, we will introduce you to 10 of the best books for Unix beginners that we have carefully selected based on their quality, relevance, popularity and reviews. These books will cover various aspects of Unix, such as system programming, command line, network programming, system administration and philosophy. These books will also suit different learning styles and preferences, such as practical guides, comprehensive references, classic texts and inspiring essays.


Whether you want to learn Unix for fun, for work or for education, these books will help you achieve your goals and enjoy your journey. Let's get started!


Top 10 Books for Unix Beginners




  • The Linux Programming Interface: A Linux and UNIX System Programming by Michael Kerrisk



This book is a comprehensive guide to system programming with Linux and UNIX. It covers over 500 system calls and library functions that are essential for developing applications that interact with the kernel and other processes.


The author, Michael Kerrisk, is a maintainer of the Linux man-pages project and an expert on Linux system programming. He explains the topics in a clear and detailed manner, with examples, diagrams and tables to illustrate the concepts. He also provides exercises and solutions at the end of each chapter to test your understanding and practice your skills.


This book covers topics such as file I/O, processes, signals, threads, IPC, sockets, timers, signals, memory management, security, namespaces, cgroups and more. It also includes chapters on Linux-specific features, such as /proc filesystem, epoll, inotify and fanotify.


This book is suitable for beginners who have some basic knowledge of C programming and want to learn how to write system programs with Linux and UNIX. It is also a valuable reference for experienced programmers who want to deepen their knowledge and skills.


  • How Linux Works: What Every Superuser Should Know by Brian Ward



This book is a conceptual book that explains how Linux works from a user's perspective. It covers the core components and mechanisms of Linux, such as booting, kernel, shell, development tools, networking, security and more.


The author, Brian Ward, is a software engineer and a Linux enthusiast. He writes in a simple and engaging style, with real-world examples and analogies to help you understand the concepts. He also provides practical tips and tricks to help you use Linux more effectively and efficiently.


This book covers topics such as boot loaders, init systems, systemd, daemons, processes, file systems, devices, modules, libraries, compilers, debuggers, editors, terminals, shells, scripting languages, environment variables, pipes, redirections, permissions, users, groups, sudo, firewalls, iptables, DNS servers, DHCP servers and more.


This book is suitable for beginners who want to learn how Linux works under the hood and how to use it as a superuser. It is also a useful resource for intermediate users who want to refresh their knowledge and learn new things.


  • Linux Pocket Guide: Essential Commands by Daniel J. Barrett



This book is a concise guide to the most essential commands in Linux. It covers over 100 commands that can help you perform various tasks on Linux efficiently and creatively.


The author, Daniel J. Barrett, is a software engineer and a Linux user since 1993. He organizes the commands into categories based on their functionality and provides clear explanations and examples for each command. He also includes new commands in the third edition of this book that can help you process images and audio files.


This book covers topics such as installing software packages with apt-get and rpm commands; managing files and directories with cp , mv , rm , ln , find , grep , tar , gzip , bzip2 , xz commands; manipulating text files with cat , head , tail , sort , uniq , cut , paste , join , sed , awk commands; creating and editing files with nano , vi , emacs commands; writing shell scripts with bash , sh , test , expr , read commands; using regular expressions with egrep command; using pipes and redirections; using sudo command; using ssh command; using curl command; using git command; using imagemagick command; using ffmpeg command; using screen command; using tmux command; using cron command; using ps command; using top command; using kill command; using lsof command; using strace command; using ping command; using traceroute command; using netstat command; using tcpdump command; using nmap command; using whois command; using dig command.


This book is suitable for beginners who want to learn the most useful commands in Linux quickly and easily. It is also a handy reference for experienced users who want to look up commands quickly.


  • The Linux Command Line: A Complete Introduction by William E. Shotts Jr.



  • Advanced Programming in the UNIX Environment by W. Richard Stevens and Stephen A. Rago



This book is a classic text on UNIX system programming. It covers the fundamental concepts and techniques of programming with UNIX system calls and library functions.


The authors, W. Richard Stevens and Stephen A. Rago, are renowned experts on UNIX and network programming. They explain the topics in a clear and thorough manner, with examples, exercises and solutions to reinforce the learning. They also update the book to reflect the latest standards and implementations of UNIX.


This book covers topics such as file I/O, directories, links, file systems, processes, signals, threads, IPC, sockets, terminals, pseudo terminals, daemons, timers, asynchronous I/O, event notification and more. It also includes chapters on advanced topics such as threads synchronization, thread cancellation and cleanup handlers.


This book is suitable for beginners who have some basic knowledge of C programming and want to learn how to program with UNIX system calls and library functions. It is also a valuable reference for experienced programmers who want to improve their skills and knowledge.


  • Advanced UNIX Programming by Marc J. Rochkind



This book is another classic text on UNIX system programming. It covers the advanced concepts and techniques of programming with UNIX system calls and library functions.


The author, Marc J. Rochkind, is a veteran UNIX programmer and consultant. He writes in a lucid and engaging style, with examples, exercises and solutions to illustrate the concepts. He also updates the book to cover the latest versions of UNIX and Linux.


This book covers topics such as file I/O, directories, links, file systems, processes, signals, threads, IPC, sockets, terminals, pseudo terminals, daemons, timers, asynchronous I/O, event notification and more. It also includes chapters on advanced topics such as memory mapping, shared memory segments and message queues.


This book is suitable for beginners who have some basic knowledge of C programming and want to learn how to program with UNIX system calls and library functions. It is also a valuable reference for experienced programmers who want to improve their skills and knowledge.


  • UNIX and Linux System Administration Handbook by Evi Nemeth, Garth Snyder, Trent R. Hein and Ben Whaley



This book is a comprehensive guide to system administration with UNIX and Linux. It covers the principles and practices of managing various aspects of UNIX and Linux systems.


The authors are experienced system administrators and educators who share their insights and tips on how to administer UNIX and Linux systems effectively and efficiently. They write in a humorous and lively style that makes the book fun to read. They also update the book to cover the latest technologies and trends in system administration.


This book covers topics such as booting and shutdown procedures; user management; file systems; backup and recovery; networking; security; web servers; email servers; DNS servers; database servers; virtualization; cloud computing; scripting languages; automation tools; monitoring tools; troubleshooting tools; performance tuning; best practices; case studies; etc.


  • The Unix Programming Environment by Brian W. Kernighan and Rob Pike



This book is a classic text on the Unix philosophy and programming. It covers the basic concepts and techniques of programming with Unix tools and utilities.


The authors, Brian W. Kernighan and Rob Pike, are legendary programmers and authors who have contributed to the development and popularization of Unix. They write in a clear and engaging style, with examples, exercises and solutions to illustrate the concepts. They also share their insights and tips on how to use Unix effectively and creatively.


This book covers topics such as shell programming, file processing, text editing, filters, pipes, redirections, regular expressions, grep, sed, awk, make, yacc, troff, ms, mm, tbl, eqn, pic and more.


This book is suitable for beginners who want to learn the Unix philosophy and programming from the ground up. It is also a useful resource for intermediate and advanced users who want to refresh their knowledge and learn new things.


  • The Art of UNIX Programming by Eric S. Raymond



This book is an inspiring essay on the Unix philosophy and culture. It covers the history, principles and practices of Unix programming from a hacker's perspective.


The author, Eric S. Raymond, is a prominent hacker and open source advocate who has written several influential books and essays on software development and culture. He writes in a passionate and provocative style, with anecdotes, quotations and examples to convey his message. He also provides practical advice and guidelines on how to apply the Unix philosophy to various domains and problems.


collaboration, testing, debugging and more.


This book is suitable for beginners who want to learn the Unix philosophy and culture from a hacker's perspective. It is also a useful resource for intermediate and advanced users who want to improve their software development practices and skills.


Conclusion




In this article, we have introduced you to 10 of the best books for Unix beginners that cover various aspects of Unix, such as system programming, command line, network programming, system administration and philosophy. These books will help you learn Unix from different angles and levels, and provide you with valuable knowledge and skills that can be applied to many domains and problems.


Unix is not just an operating system, but a way of thinking and doing things. By reading these books, you will not only learn how to use Unix, but also how to appreciate its beauty and power. You will also become part of a rich and vibrant community of Unix users and developers who share a common passion and vision.


We hope that this article has inspired you to start or continue your journey with Unix. If you have any questions or feedback, please feel free to contact us. Happy reading and happy hacking!


FAQs




  • What is the difference between Unix and Linux?



Unix is the original operating system that was developed in the 1970s at Bell Labs by Ken Thompson, Dennis Ritchie and others. Linux is an operating system that was created in the 1990s by Linus Torvalds as a free and open source alternative to Unix. Linux is based on the Unix design and follows the Unix philosophy, but it is not a direct descendant of Unix. Linux also has many features and extensions that are not present in Unix.


  • How can I practice Unix commands online?



There are several online platforms that allow you to practice Unix commands without installing anything on your computer. Some of them are:


  • https://www.tutorialspoint.com/unix_terminal_online.php



  • https://www.webminal.org/



  • https://www.jdoodle.com/execute-unix-online



  • https://repl.it/languages/bash



  • What are some of the best online courses for Unix beginners?



There are many online courses that can help you learn Unix from scratch or improve your skills. Some of them are:


  • Unix/Linux Training by Udemy



  • Introduction to UNIX by Coursera



  • Introduction to Linux by edX



  • Learn the Command Line by Codecademy



  • How can I install Unix or Linux on my computer?



There are different ways to install Unix or Linux on your computer depending on your preferences and needs. Some of them are:


  • Dual boot: This means installing Unix or Linux alongside your existing operating system (such as Windows or MacOS) on separate partitions of your hard drive. This way, you can choose which operating system to boot into when you start your computer.



  • Virtual machine: This means running Unix or Linux as a guest operating system inside a virtual machine software (such as VirtualBox or VMware) on your host operating system (such as Windows or MacOS). This way, you can run both operating systems simultaneously without affecting each other.



  • Live CD/DVD/USB: This means booting into Unix or Linux from a removable media (such as a CD, DVD or USB drive) without installing anything on your hard drive. This way, you can try out Unix or Linux without making any changes to your computer.



  • What are some of the most useful Unix commands?



There are hundreds of Unix commands that can help you perform various tasks on your system. Some of the most useful ones are:


  • ls: This command lists the files and directories in the current or specified directory.



  • cd: This command changes the current working directory to the specified directory.



  • pwd: This command prints the current working directory.



  • cp: This command copies files and directories from one location to another.



  • mv: This command moves or renames files and directories from one location to another.



  • rm: This command removes files and directories.



  • cat: This command concatenates and displays files.



  • echo: This command prints a message or a value of a variable to the standard output.



  • grep: This command searches for a pattern in a file or input and prints the matching lines.



  • find: This command finds files and directories that match certain criteria.



  • ps: This command displays information about the running processes.



  • kill: This command sends a signal to a process to terminate it.



  • ping: This command tests the connectivity between two hosts by sending packets and measuring the response time.



  • ssh: This command establishes a secure shell connection to a remote host.



  • scp: This command securely copies files between hosts using ssh.



  • curl: This command transfers data from or to a server using various protocols.



  • tar: This command creates or extracts compressed archive files.



  • man: This command displays the manual page for a given command or topic.



71b2f0854b


About

Welcome to the group! You can connect with other members, ge...

Members

bottom of page